Linda Goss was born in Dartmouth, Devon. At the age of eight she became a pupil of Kira Strakhova, the celebrated ballet teacher who had been a soloist with the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo before establishing her own ballet school.

 

Linda made her first public debut at the age of nine. With the recognition of her natural talent and under the guidance of Madame Strakhova, at the age of thirteen she was accepted for training at the Bolshoi Ballet School in Moscow, the only westerner to do so.

 

Well into her training, when an ankle injury and consequent surgery put her future as a dancer into question, Linda was given the unique opportunity to study the Vaganova teaching method on the Bolshoi School's teacher training course, alongside completing her dance studies. This had never been offered to a student outside Russia before.

 

Graduating at nineteen, Linda left Moscow with these exceptional qualifications. She was much in demand and began her international career accepting her first teaching position at the Academie Internationale de Danse in Paris.

 

Since then Linda's skills and teaching experience have been sought after worldwide and she has taught in numerous professional dance companies and major ballet schools.

 

In 2002 Linda added to her list of achievements by giving birth to her twins, Vadim and Amelia.

 

Linda Goss

Dance education

Kira Strakhova Ballet School

 

Bolshoi Ballet School, Moscow

Courses: Classical Ballet Training including Pas de deux & Reportoire, Character, Modern Dance, Russian Folk Dance, Acting, Stage make-up, History of Ballet, Theatre, Art, Music.

 

Bolshoi Ballet Teacher Training Course, Moscow

Courses: Method and Theory of Classical Ballet, Anatomy, Psychology, Music & Music Theory.

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Linda Goss aged thirteen, in Moscow

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Literally, hundreds of Linda's students from all over the world have gone on to achieve success as either dancers, choreographers or to hold prominent positions in the dance world.

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